contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent

  • allergy to rubber accelerators | dermnet nz

    Allergy to rubber accelerators | DermNet NZ

    Even though some rubber gloves are labelled 'hypoallergenic' it is wise to contact the manufacturer to determine if they contain any of the rubber accelerators you are allergic to. Vinyl gloves may be a suitable alternative although some people are allergic to both rubber and vinyl.

  • contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent

    Contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent

    The overall prevalence of contact allergy to rubber accelerators was 3.1% with no significant change during the study period (P trend = 0.667). Contact allergy to thiuram mix was the most prevalent and was significantly associated with occupational contact dermatitis, hand dermatitis, age >40 years and facial dermatitis in adjusted binary

  • contact dermatitis & latex allergy | faqs | infection control

    Contact Dermatitis & Latex Allergy | FAQs | Infection Control

    Irritant contact dermatitis is common, nonallergic, and develops as dry, itchy, irritated areas on the skin around the area of contact. Allergic contact dermatitis can result from exposure to accelerators and other chemicals used to manufacture rubber gloves or from exposure to other chemicals found in the dental practice setting.

  • differentiation of latex allergy from irritant contact

    Differentiation of Latex Allergy From Irritant Contact

    Latex allergy is an all-encompassing term used to describe hypersensitivity reactions to products containing natural rubber latex from the Hevea brasiliensis tree and affects approximately 1% to 2% of the general population. 1 Although latex gloves are the most widely known culprits, several other commonly used products can contain natural rubber latex, including adhesive tape, balloons

  • allergic contact dermatitis - medscape

    Allergic Contact Dermatitis - Medscape

    Thiuram, another accelerator, is the most common cause of glove allergy; however, it is also used as an antimicrobial. It can be found in fungicides and soaps (Geier, Lessmann, Uter, & Schnuch, 2003).

  • chemical accelerators - the glove-related allergen of the

    Chemical Accelerators - the Glove-Related Allergen of the

    Allergic contact dermatitis (a type IV allergy) occurs when a substance triggers an immune response in your skin. It can appear as a red rash with bumps and sometimes blisters. In laboratories, it is most often caused by exposure to natural rubber- or sulfur-based chemical accelerators used to make common non-latex gloves.

  • hand eczema and occupational contact allergies in healthcare

    Hand eczema and occupational contact allergies in healthcare

    Conclusion: Contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent. Clinicians should be aware of the hitherto unexplored clinical association with facial dermatitis. View

  • occupational contact allergy caused by rubber gloves

    Occupational contact allergy caused by rubber gloves

    Conclusion: Contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent. Clinicians should be aware of the hitherto unexplored clinical association with facial dermatitis. View

  • fitbit rash: allergy or contact dermatitis?

    Fitbit Rash: Allergy or Contact Dermatitis?

    Allergic contact dermatitis is due to a true allergy to a component of the device in the same way that someone has an allergy to poison ivy. An irritant contact dermatitis, however, could be due (as Fitbit is claiming) to soaps, sweat, and water associated with prolonged use of the device (especially in the setting of sweat and friction from

  • contact dermatitis - dermatologic disorders - merck manuals

    Contact Dermatitis - Dermatologic Disorders - Merck Manuals

    ICD is more common among patients with atopic disorders, in whom ICD also may initiate immunologic sensitization and hence allergic contact dermatitis. Phototoxic dermatitis (see Chemical photosensitivity ) is a variant in which topical (eg, perfumes, coal tar) or ingested (eg, psoralens) agents generate damaging free radicals and inflammatory

  • pediatric contact dermatitis: background, pathophysiology

    Pediatric Contact Dermatitis: Background, Pathophysiology

    Allergic contact dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis is a type IV (ie, delayed) hypersensitivity reaction that affects previously sensitized individuals only. A common example of allergic contact dermatitis is rhus dermatitis, the allergic reaction to plants such as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac.

  • marie-noëlle crepy rubber: new allergens and preventive measures

    Marie-Noëlle CREPY Rubber: new allergens and preventive measures

    Natural rubber latex (NRL) and rubber accelerators are well-known causes of occupational skin diseases. The latest epidemiological data on rubber allergy show that rubber additives are still among the allergens most strongly associated with occupational contact dermatitis, however, a decrease in NRL allergy has been confirmed. A review of