supply accelerator neurofilament polymer transport in axons

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. Yan Y(1), Brown A. Author information: (1)Center for Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons | journal

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons | Journal

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - abstract - europe pmc

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - Abstract - Europe PMC

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized

    Slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized

    A major issue in the slow transport of cytoskeletal proteins is the form in which they are transported. We have investigated the possibility that unpolymerized as well as polymerized cytoskeletal proteins can be actively transported in axons. We report the active transport of highly diffusible tubulin oligomers, as well as transport of the less diffusible neurofilament polymers. After

  • slow axonal transport of neurofilament protein in cultured

    Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilament Protein in Cultured

    In fact, analyses of neurofilament protein transport in optic nerve axons using two dimensional PAGE, which allows separation of comigrating SCa and SCb proteins, has shown that there is a single population of neurofilament proteins that is transported at a broad range of rates, with no evidence for distinct stationary and moving populations

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons | journal

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons | Journal

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - abstract - europe pmc

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - Abstract - Europe PMC

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. Yan Y(1), Brown A. Author information: (1)Center for Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial.

  • neurofilaments at a glance | journal of cell science

    Neurofilaments at a glance | Journal of Cell Science

    The earliest in vivo pulse-labeling studies of neurofilament protein transport by Lasek and colleagues were initially interpreted to support the idea that the labeled neurofilaments that undergo transport constitute the entire NF cytoskeleton within axons, which, according to this model, is continuously moving (Lasek et al., 1984; Lasek et al

  • slow axonal transport of neurofilament protein in cultured

    Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilament Protein in Cultured

    In fact, analyses of neurofilament protein transport in optic nerve axons using two dimensional PAGE, which allows separation of comigrating SCa and SCb proteins, has shown that there is a single population of neurofilament proteins that is transported at a broad range of rates, with no evidence for distinct stationary and moving populations

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons | journal

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons | Journal

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - abstract - europe pmc

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - Abstract - Europe PMC

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. Yan Y(1), Brown A. Author information: (1)Center for Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial.

  • slow axonal transport of neurofilament protein in cultured

    Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilament Protein in Cultured

    In fact, analyses of neurofilament protein transport in optic nerve axons using two dimensional PAGE, which allows separation of comigrating SCa and SCb proteins, has shown that there is a single population of neurofilament proteins that is transported at a broad range of rates, with no evidence for distinct stationary and moving populations

  • axonal transport

    Axonal transport

    Axonal transport, also called axoplasmic transport or axoplasmic flow, is a cellular process responsible for movement of mitochondria, lipids, synaptic vesicles, proteins, and other organelles to and from a neurons cell body, through the cytoplasm of its axon called the axoplasm.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons | journal

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons | Journal

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. Yan Y(1), Brown A. Author information: (1)Center for Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - abstract - europe pmc

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - Abstract - Europe PMC

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Support for this polymer transport hypothesis came initially from ultrastructural studies. For ex- ample, axons regenerating after transection show a transient decrease in the amount of neurofilament protein transported into the axon, resulting in a local decrease in neurofilament number and axon diam-

  • slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    A similar correlation between the amount of axon- ally transported protein and neurofilament number has also been observed in a variety of neuropathies that alter neurofilament protein [email protected] Also consistent with their transport as polymers, neuro- filaments accumulate proximal to axon constrictions and become depleted distally8,9

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. Yan Y(1), Brown A. Author information: (1)Center for Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons | journal

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons | Journal

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - abstract - europe pmc

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - Abstract - Europe PMC

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • slow axonal transport of neurofilament protein in cultured

    Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilament Protein in Cultured

    In fact, analyses of neurofilament protein transport in optic nerve axons using two dimensional PAGE, which allows separation of comigrating SCa and SCb proteins, has shown that there is a single population of neurofilament proteins that is transported at a broad range of rates, with no evidence for distinct stationary and moving populations

  • axonal transport

    Axonal transport

    Axonal transport, also called axoplasmic transport or axoplasmic flow, is a cellular process responsible for movement of mitochondria, lipids, synaptic vesicles, proteins, and other organelles to and from a neurons cell body, through the cytoplasm of its axon called the axoplasm.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that

  • slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    A similar correlation between the amount of axon- ally transported protein and neurofilament number has also been observed in a variety of neuropathies that alter neurofilament protein [email protected] Also consistent with their transport as polymers, neuro- filaments accumulate proximal to axon constrictions and become depleted distally8,9

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - abstract - europe pmc

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - Abstract - Europe PMC

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Support for this polymer transport hypothesis came initially from ultrastructural studies. For ex- ample, axons regenerating after transection show a transient decrease in the amount of neurofilament protein transported into the axon, resulting in a local decrease in neurofilament number and axon diam-

  • axonal transport of neurofilament is accelerated

    Axonal transport of neurofilament is accelerated

    328 Brain Research, 491 (1989) 328-334 Elsevier BRE 14615 Axonal transport of neurofilament is accelerated in peripheral nerve during 2,5-hexanedione intoxication* S. Monaco1, J. Jacob2, H. Jenich1, A. Patton1, L. Autilio-GambettiI and P. Gambetti1 1Division of Neuropathology, Institute of Pathology and 2Department of Developmental Genetics and Anatomy, Case Western Reserve University

  • axonal transport: the orderly motion of axonal structures

    Axonal transport: The orderly motion of axonal structures

    One goal has been to determine whether the transport behavior of individual neurofilaments as observed in cultured neurons imaged over short time frames can explain the transport behavior of neurofilament proteins in axons observed over long time frames in vivo with the pulse-chase approach (Brown et al., 2005, Li et al., 2012). To address this

  • slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized

    Slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized

    A major issue in the slow transport of cytoskeletal proteins is the form in which they are transported. We have investigated the possibility that unpolymerized as well as polymerized cytoskeletal proteins can be actively transported in axons. We report the active transport of highly diffusible tubulin oligomers, as well as transport of the less diffusible neurofilament polymers. After

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. Yan Y(1), Brown A. Author information: (1)Center for Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons | journal

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons | Journal

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - abstract - europe pmc

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - Abstract - Europe PMC

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized

    Slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized

    A major issue in the slow transport of cytoskeletal proteins is the form in which they are transported. We have investigated the possibility that unpolymerized as well as polymerized cytoskeletal proteins can be actively transported in axons. We report the active transport of highly diffusible tubulin oligomers, as well as transport of the less diffusible neurofilament polymers. After

  • slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Support for this polymer transport hypothesis came initially from ultrastructural studies. For ex- ample, axons regenerating after transection show a transient decrease in the amount of neurofilament protein transported into the axon, resulting in a local decrease in neurofilament number and axon diam-

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that

  • axons

    Axons

    Axon: Conduction Velocity. Normal Ranges Myelinated axons: 35 to 75 M/s; Unmyelinated axons: 0.1 to 5 M/s; Axon diameter Larger diameter axons: Conduct at faster velocities

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - abstract - europe pmc

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - Abstract - Europe PMC

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Support for this polymer transport hypothesis came initially from ultrastructural studies. For ex- ample, axons regenerating after transection show a transient decrease in the amount of neurofilament protein transported into the axon, resulting in a local decrease in neurofilament number and axon diam-

  • axonal transport of neurofilament is accelerated

    Axonal transport of neurofilament is accelerated

    328 Brain Research, 491 (1989) 328-334 Elsevier BRE 14615 Axonal transport of neurofilament is accelerated in peripheral nerve during 2,5-hexanedione intoxication* S. Monaco1, J. Jacob2, H. Jenich1, A. Patton1, L. Autilio-GambettiI and P. Gambetti1 1Division of Neuropathology, Institute of Pathology and 2Department of Developmental Genetics and Anatomy, Case Western Reserve University

  • slow axonal transport of neurofilament protein in cultured

    Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilament Protein in Cultured

    In fact, analyses of neurofilament protein transport in optic nerve axons using two dimensional PAGE, which allows separation of comigrating SCa and SCb proteins, has shown that there is a single population of neurofilament proteins that is transported at a broad range of rates, with no evidence for distinct stationary and moving populations

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons.

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. Yan Y(1), Brown A. Author information: (1)Center for Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons | journal

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons | Journal

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - abstract - europe pmc

    Neurofilament polymer transport in axons. - Abstract - Europe PMC

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single-neurofilament polymers.

  • microtubule transport in the axon

    Microtubule Transport in the Axon

    The theory of MT transport in axons was first proposed on the basis of classic axonal transport studies conducted over two decades ago. In these studies, radiolabeled amino acids were introduced into a cluster of cell bodies in which they were rapidly taken up and utilized for protein synthesis (Lasek, 1988, Baas and Brown, 1997, Brown, 2000).

  • slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Slow axonal transport: the polymer transport model

    Support for this polymer transport hypothesis came initially from ultrastructural studies. For ex- ample, axons regenerating after transection show a transient decrease in the amount of neurofilament protein transported into the axon, resulting in a local decrease in neurofilament number and axon diam-

  • axonal transport and neurodegenerative disease

    Axonal transport and neurodegenerative disease

    The extended axons of motor neurons make these cells uniquely vulnerable to defects in active transport, so it is reasonable to propose that even when other defects, such as aggregation of mutant SOD1, are a proximal cause of disease, a secondary inhibition of axonal transport may play a critical role in the downstream pathogenic mechanisms.

  • review : the synthesis, axonal transport, and phosphorylation

    Review : The Synthesis, Axonal Transport, and Phosphorylation

    Axonal diameter is the principal determinant of conduction velocity in myelinated nerve fibers, but, until recently, the factors that determine axonal diameter have not been understood.

  • microtubule transport in the axon

    Microtubule Transport in the Axon

    The theory of MT transport in axons was first proposed on the basis of classic axonal transport studies conducted over two decades ago. In these studies, radiolabeled amino acids were introduced into a cluster of cell bodies in which they were rapidly taken up and utilized for protein synthesis (Lasek, 1988, Baas and Brown, 1997, Brown, 2000).

  • axonal transport of neurofilaments in normal and disease

    Axonal transport of neurofilaments in normal and disease

    Disruption of neurofilament assembly due to CMT mutant neurofilaments [NF-L(Pro8Arg) and NF-L(Gln333Pro)] leads to impaired axonal transportation in SW13 mammalian cells and rat cortical neurons

  • (pdf) transport of neurofilaments in growing axons requires

    (PDF) Transport of neurofilaments in growing axons requires

    Neurofilament transport in actin filament-depleted axons. Se- lected frames from sequences of two axons treated with 5 ␮ M latrunculin for 6 hr. Elapsed time in seconds is indicated in the lower

  • neurofilament and tubulin transport slows along the course

    Neurofilament and tubulin transport slows along the course

    The rate of axonal transport of tubulin and of neurofilament proteins was measured in mature, non-growing, axons of rat lumbar ventral roots and sciat…

  • acrylamide retards the slow axonal transport

    Acrylamide Retards the Slow Axonal Transport

    In addition, ATP level decreased significantly in ACR-treated DRG neurons. Our findings indicate that ACR exposure retards slow axonal transport of NF-M, and suggest that the increase of neurofilament cargoes, motor proteins, dynamitin of dynactin, and the inadequate ATP supply contribute to the ACR-induced retardation of slow axonal transport.

  • (pdf) transport of neurofilaments in growing axons requires

    (PDF) Transport of neurofilaments in growing axons requires

    Neurofilament transport in actin filament-depleted axons. Se- lected frames from sequences of two axons treated with 5 ␮ M latrunculin for 6 hr. Elapsed time in seconds is indicated in the lower

  • neurofilaments are transported rapidly but intermittently

    Neurofilaments Are Transported Rapidly But Intermittently

    Slow axonal transport conveys cytoskeletal proteins from cell body to axon tip. This transport provides the axon with the architectural elements that are required to generate and maintain its elongate shape and also generates forces within the axon that are necessary for axon growth and navigation. The mechanisms of cytoskeletal transport in axons are unknown. One hypothesis states that

  • acrylamide retards the slow axonal transport

    Acrylamide Retards the Slow Axonal Transport

    In addition, ATP level decreased significantly in ACR-treated DRG neurons. Our findings indicate that ACR exposure retards slow axonal transport of NF-M, and suggest that the increase of neurofilament cargoes, motor proteins, dynamitin of dynactin, and the inadequate ATP supply contribute to the ACR-induced retardation of slow axonal transport.

  • (pdf) slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized

    (PDF) Slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized

    Slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized neurofilament in the squid giant axon Article (PDF Available) in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 96(20):11589-94 · October

  • axonal transport of neurofilaments in normal and disease

    Axonal transport of neurofilaments in normal and disease

    Disruption of neurofilament assembly due to CMT mutant neurofilaments [NF-L(Pro8Arg) and NF-L(Gln333Pro)] leads to impaired axonal transportation in SW13 mammalian cells and rat cortical neurons

  • live-cell imaging of slow axonal transport in cultured

    Live-Cell Imaging of Slow Axonal Transport in Cultured

    Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons. Article. to enhance the efficiency of neurofilament transport in axons by delivering neurofilaments to their microtubule tracks, thereby reducing the

  • a critical reevaluation of the stationary axonal cytoskeleton

    A critical reevaluation of the stationary axonal cytoskeleton

    We show that the transport kinetics and distribution of neurofilaments in mouse optic nerve can all be explained fully by a "stop-and-go" model of neurofilament transport, in which axons contain a